sábado, 3 de diciembre de 2016

Exercises for pain free hands - Harvard Health

Exercises for pain free hands - Harvard Health
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Exercises for pain free hands

hand stretching pain free
Your hands perform countless small and large tasks each day—from pouring coffee, brushing teeth, and buttoning shirts to raking leaves or kneading bread.

Weight-related stroke risk varies for different stroke types, analysis finds - Harvard Health

Weight-related stroke risk varies for different stroke types, analysis finds - Harvard Health
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Weight-related stroke risk varies for different stroke types, analysis finds

Research we're watching

Study links busy schedules to better cognitive function - Harvard Health

Study links busy schedules to better cognitive function - Harvard Health
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Study links busy schedules to better cognitive function

In the Journals

Staying busy may improve your memory, suggests a study published May 17, 2016, in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.

Vaccine Information Statement | Home | VIS | CDC

Vaccine Information Statement | Home | VIS | CDC
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People
CDC Vaccine Information Statements Update

How to Use VISs


What are VISs?

Vaccine Information Statements (VISs) are information sheets produced by the CDC that explain both the benefits and risks of a vaccine to vaccine recipients.
Federal law requires that healthcare staff provide a VIS to a patient, parent, or legal representative before each dose of certain vaccines.

Wildfires|CDC: What to do before, during and after a wildfire

Wildfires|CDC
Public Health Emergency.  Resilient People. Healthy Communities.  A Nation Prepared.
More and more people make their homes in areas that are prone to wildfires. You can take steps to be ready for a wildfire and prepare your home and landscaping to reduce your risk. Learn how to protect yourself and your family from a wildfire, evacuate safely during a wildfire, and how to stay healthy when you return home.

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View a full-sized image of the Be Ready: Wildfires Infographic. Share it on social media or print it out to post in your office, school, or home.

Americans' Cholesterol Levels Keep Falling

https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162292.html
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Americans' Cholesterol Levels Keep Falling

Eliminating trans fats from the U.S. diet may be one factor in this healthy trend, CDC researchers say
By Robert Preidt
Wednesday, November 30, 2016
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WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Healthier diets may be a factor in the ongoing decline in levels of unhealthy blood fats for Americans, new research suggests.
According to the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, blood levels of total cholesterol, LDL ("bad") cholesterol, and the blood fats known as triglycerides have continued to fall among adults through 2014.
All of that may be adding up to improved heart health nationwide, with death rates from heart disease also on the decline, the CDC noted.
"Removal of trans-fatty acids in foods has been suggested as an explanation for the observed trends of triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol levels, and [total cholesterol] levels," wrote a team led by CDC researcher Asher Rosinger.
These trends "may be contributing to declining death rates owing to coronary heart disease since 1999," the study authors suggested.
One cardiovascular specialist was heartened by the news.
"Although heart disease remains the number one cause of death, we have made tremendous strides in lowering the number of people at risk," said Dr. Satjit Bhusri, a cardiologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.
"As this study shows, through prevention and education we have helped lower cholesterol; a key risk factor in heart disease," he said.
The CDC team noted that between 1999 and 2010, blood cholesterol levels had edged downward among U.S. adults aged 20 or over. The new report sought to determine if that improvement had continued through 2013-2014.
The study included data from more than 39,000 adults who had their total cholesterol levels checked, about 17,000 who had undergone LDL cholesterol level testing, and nearly 17,500 who had their triglyceride levels tracked as part of the ongoing U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
Average total cholesterol fell from 204 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) of blood in 1999-2000 to 189 mg/dL in 2013-2014.
Between the relatively short span of 2011-2012 to 2013-2014, average total cholesterol levels plummeted by 6 mg/dL, the authors noted.
Average triglyceride levels also decreased -- from 123 mg/dL in 1999-2000 to 97 mg/dL in 2013-2014, with a 13 mg/dL drop since 2011-2012.
Average LDL "bad" cholesterol levels fell from 126 mg/dL to 111 mg/dL during the study period, with a 4 mg/dL drop between 2011-2012 and 2013-2014, the CDC reported.
Dr. David Friedman is chief of heart failure services at Long Island Jewish Valley Stream Hospital in Valley Stream, N.Y. He believes the findings "highlight that over the last number of years, American adults are paying heed and perhaps are being more mindful of cutting out fatty foods to a good degree."
In addition, "public health messages on cholesterol-lowering, as well as patient adherence to medication for cholesterol treatment, all seem to be working," Friedman said.
The study was published online Nov. 30 in the journal JAMA Cardiology.
SOURCES: David Friedman, M.D., chief, heart failure services, Long Island Jewish Valley Stream Hospital, Valley Stream, N.Y.; Satjit Bhusri, M.D., cardiologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; JAMA Cardiology, news release, Nov. 30, 2016
HealthDay
News stories are provided by HealthDay and do not reflect the views of MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine, the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or federal policy.
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Standing or 'Easy' Walks May Help Type 2 Diabetics Control Blood Sugar

https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162286.html
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Standing or 'Easy' Walks May Help Type 2 Diabetics Control Blood Sugar

Study counters notion that vigorous exercise is key to battling the illness
By Robert Preidt
Thursday, December 1, 2016
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WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For people with type 2 diabetes, better blood sugar control may be as easy as getting up off the couch and standing every so often, or taking a leisurely walk, a new study shows.
Dutch researchers noted that "moderate to vigorous" exercise is often recommended for people with diabetes -- but most patients don't comply with that advice.
This small new study suggests that even sitting a bit less might be of real benefit.
One diabetes expert in the United States agreed with that advice.
"For years, I would suggest an exercise regimen to my patients that I knew was doomed to failure," said Dr. Robert Courgi, an endocrinologist at Northwell Health's Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y.
However, "by tweaking the message a bit, the odds of success increase significantly," he said. "Ultimately, any activity helps lower glucose [blood sugar]. The message of 'sitting less' will have a higher success rate than exercise regimens of the past."
Current physical activity guidelines call for a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise a week to help prevent type 2 diabetes. But the study authors pointed out that nine out of 10 people fail to meet this guideline.
The new study was led by Bernard Duvivier of the department of human biology and movement science at Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands. His team wanted to see if a program to reduce sitting time -- by encouraging patients to simply stand and do light-intensity walking -- could offer an alternative to a standard exercise regimen.
The study included 19 adults, average age 63, with type 2 diabetes who did three programs, each lasting four days. In the first program, the participants sat for 14 hours a day and did only one hour a day of walking and one hour a day of standing.
In the second program (the "sit less" program), the participants did a total of two hours a day of walking and three hours a day of standing by breaking up their sitting time every 30 minutes.
In the third program (exercise), the participants replaced an hour a day of sitting time with indoor cycling.
The sit less and exercise programs were designed to burn similar amounts of energy, the researchers said.
Significant improvements in blood sugar control occurred when the patients did the sit less program or the exercise program, but the improvements were generally stronger during the sit less phase, according to the study.
Courgi said the new trial has helped him "rethink the way I treat diabetes with exercise."
He said that, although it would be nice to see the results replicated in a larger trial, the study findings remain "very interesting."
The study was published Nov. 30 in the journal Diabetologia.
SOURCES: Robert Courgi, M.D., endocrinologist, Northwell Health's Southside Hospital, Bay Shore, N.Y.; Diabetologia, news release, Nov. 30, 2016
HealthDay
News stories are provided by HealthDay and do not reflect the views of MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine, the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or federal policy.
More Health News on:
Diabetes Type 2
Exercise and Physical Fitness